Broadcasters and Consumers Should Be Wary – NYTimes.com

If the government’s auction of some of the most valuable broadcast spectrum succeeds, broadcasters and consumers should be wary.

Once broadcasters relinquish their valuable spectrum, who will inherit their longstanding commitment to local service? The broadcast industry may have its warts, but when it comes to meeting the information needs of local communities, nobody does it better — not cable and not the Internet or wireless service providers. When the flood waters rise or the cell towers fail, local broadcasters are the go-to medium for news, weather and safety information from coast to coast.

via Broadcasters and Consumers Should Be Wary – NYTimes.com.

How much LTE spectrum do Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile have – and where? – FierceWireless

Much of the coverage of LTE revolves around how many people the networks cover or how fast the speeds are. Yet how much spectrum the carriers have to support their LTE services, and where exactly they have it across the country, is a more arcane but perhaps an even more important metric.

Indeed, how much spectrum carriers control determines how much network capacity they have in specific markets and often how fast their network speeds are.

With this in mind, FierceWireless has partnered with AllNet Labs, a wireless consulting firm, to map out exactly how much spectrum each of the four Tier 1 carriers currently has that they could deploy for LTE service, broken down on a county-by-county basis.

via How much LTE spectrum do Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile have – and where? – FierceWireless.

The case for more Wi-Fi and unlicensed airwaves just got a lot stronger — Tech News and Analysis

Summary:

Obama and the FCC are both calling for more unlicensed spectrum to fuel the tech economy. That kind of advocacy from the administration is just what we need in a government opposed to free-to-use airwaves.

via The case for more Wi-Fi and unlicensed airwaves just got a lot stronger — Tech News and Analysis.

Confused about the spectrum debate? These two commercials will help.

If all goes according to plan, next year the Federal Communications Commission will convert a big block of spectrum currently being used for television broadcasting to use for cellular service. Broadcasters will be paid to voluntarily relinquish their spectrum, which will then be auctioned off to wireless providers at a net profit to the U.S. Treasury.

via Confused about the spectrum debate? These two commercials will help..

Analyst Angle: The desirability of sub-1 GHz spectrum | Mobile Technology | Wireless Broadband | Wireless Carriers | RCR U.S. Wireless NewsMobile Technology | Wireless Broadband | Wireless Carriers | RCR U.S. Wireless News

While any spectrum is desirable, all spectrum isn’t equal. At the September Competitive Carriers Association conference, T-Mobile US CTO Neville Ray in his keynote remarks presented a slide focusing on larger competitors’ Verizon Wireless and AT&T’s dominance in low-band (sub-1 GHz) spectrum.

via Analyst Angle: The desirability of sub-1 GHz spectrum | Mobile Technology | Wireless Broadband | Wireless Carriers | RCR U.S. Wireless NewsMobile Technology | Wireless Broadband | Wireless Carriers | RCR U.S. Wireless News.

The Solution To The Wireless Spectrum Shortage: More Wires – Forbes

We’ve heard a lot recently about the pressing need for government action to free up more radio spectrum for wireless communications or to allow mergers or acquisitions purportedly aimed at the same goal. It’s no surprise that this issue attracts attention in Washington. When people can’t use their mobile devices to make or receive calls or to access content and data, they notice and they make themselves heard. And as any wireless consumer knows, service providers are struggling to meet the rapidly growing demand created by consumers’ desire for innovative devices, applications and content delivered wherever and whenever they want.

But focusing on spectrum alone is unlikely to solve wireless network congestion in the long run. Spectrum is a finite resource. While laws passed by Congress can assign and allocate spectrum, the many competing uses for capacity and the laws of physics limit how much spectrum is available for any one purpose. If consumer demand for wireless broadband continues to increase at predicted levels, policymakers will need to employ all available approaches to encourage efficient use of the wireless spectrum.

via The Solution To The Wireless Spectrum Shortage: More Wires – Forbes.