New roaming standards to fuel growth in carrier Wi-Fi | Mobile – CNET News

Major mobile operators plan on turning to Wi-Fi to add more than a fifth of additional data capacity to their networks in 2013 and 2014, according to study. And new standards make it even easier for subscribers to access these networks.

MAARead on…22% plus 20% plus 21% equals almost 2/3 of their data outside of their traditional ‘network’. Clearly there will be an ‘extension’ of their network underpinnings (the OmniRan activity for example…) to WiFi with AAA, etc.

via New roaming standards to fuel growth in carrier Wi-Fi | Mobile – CNET News.

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Wi-fi to handle majority of mobile data traffic by 2017 – Digital Lifestyle – Macworld UK

Wi-fi networks are expected to handle the majority of mobile data traffic by 2017, according to a report by Juniper on mobile data offload.Data traffic generated by mobile handsets and tablets will reach 90,000 petabytes by 2017. This is equivalent to about 42 quadrillion tweets or seven billion Blu-ray movies.Although unfathomable amounts of mobile data traffic is expected to be generated by mobile handsets and tablets by 2017, only 40 percent of the data will go over cellular networks.

via Wi-fi to handle majority of mobile data traffic by 2017 – Digital Lifestyle – Macworld UK.

Ericsson readies Wi-Fi system optimized for sports stadiums | ITworld

Ericsson readies Wi-Fi system optimized for sports stadiums | ITworld

October 16, 2012, 11:02 AM — Ericsson has unveiled a Wi-Fi access point and controller for offloading cellular traffic in densely populated areas such as stadiums. Its goal is to allow users to switch seamlessly from the cellular network to a local Wi-Fi network to solve network congestion problems.

The company sees it as a way to give thousands of spectators the bandwidth needed to update their Twitter and Facebook statuses on their phones while they all watch the same game or concert. It could also allow sports fans to see instant action replays on their phones from their stadium seats, or for music fans to upload photos and videos of a concert as it happens.

via Ericsson readies Wi-Fi system optimized for sports stadiums | ITworld.

Small cells or Wi-Fi offload? > Senza Fili Consulting

The answer to this question is easy: We need both small cells and Wi-Fi to fit all the traffic generated by smartphone, tablets and laptops.

Historically, the increase in wireless capacity has mostly come from increased cell density. Over the last 45 years, greater cell density accounted for a 1,600-fold increase in capacity, according to Martin Cooper, who led the Motorola team that developed the mobile phone in the 70s. The increase in cell density was mostly aimed at achieving coverage across the footprint.

Today the challenge is different. Mobile networks cover most of the places where humans live, work, or travel. The need is to increase cell density where coverage is already provided by the macro cells. Technological advances and new spectrum allocations will definitely help to improve capacity, but alone they are not sufficient to address the 18-fold traffic increase over the next five years predicted by Cisco’s VNI. According to Alcatel Lucent, increase in cell density will have five times the impact of new spectrum allocation or improvements in spectral efficiency from new technologies such as LTE.

via Small cells or Wi-Fi offload? > Senza Fili Consulting.

Building new channels for the data flood

The enormous success of the smartphone market has put a rocket booster under Apple Inc.’s stock price. But it’s also stressing the nation’s cellular communications networks.

A torrent of smartphone sales has generated a flood of wireless data traffic that cellular giants, including AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications, are struggling to keep up with.

Their challenges mean sales opportunities for technology providers — among them Austin’s Freescale Semiconductor — that are putting together the building blocks for future networks that will handle more data more easily.

via Building new channels for the data flood.

Small Cells and WiFi Solutions to Take Nearly 60% of Mobile Traffic Over 5 Years

Small Cells and WiFi Solutions to Take Nearly 60% of Mobile Traffic Over 5 Years

A new report from Juniper Research has found that while the level of data delivered to mobile devices is expected to continue to expand dramatically over the next five years, service providers will offload nearly 60% of traffic in that period. According to the report, service providers are increasingly seeking to reduce the strain on their network caused by the proliferation of connected smart devices by deploying their own WiFi hotspot networks and offering small cell solutions to end-users.

via Small Cells and WiFi Solutions to Take Nearly 60% of Mobile Traffic Over 5 Years.