Broadcast TV Aims for Your Smartphone – Technology Review

Dozens of players within the U.S. broadcast industry are behind two parallel efforts to make iPhones or iPads double as conventional television sets. The plan is to upgrade broadcasting infrastructure to beam out mobile-ready signals.

A consortium called Dyle TV—representing 18 broadcast groups, including Gannet, Hearst, Fox, Univision, ABC, NBC, and CBS—is farthest along in upgrading broadcast networks; it has completed upgrades on 90 TV stations, representing portions of markets covering 55 percent of the U.S. population. Dyle TV is expected to launch sometime later this year with a dongle that can be affixed to the accessory port of iPhones or iPads.

A second joint venture, Mobile500, represents much of the rest of the TV industry, with 437 stations, only 16 of whom have upgraded their networks. This group plans to launch a study October 1 of how people use the service—handing out dongles to 1,500 consumers in Seattle and Minneapolis, where several stations have upgraded.

via Broadcast TV Aims for Your Smartphone – Technology Review.

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ATSC Adopts Non-Real-Time Standard – 2012-05-29 17:49:53 | Broadcasting & Cable

In an important step towards expanding the kind of services that broadcasters can offer, the Advanced Television Systems Committee ATSC has announced that the ATSC NRT Non-Real-Time Content Delivery standard has been approved.The A/103 standard, which is a backwards-compatible enhancement to existing digital TV broadcasts, would allow broadcasters to deliver file-based content, including programs and clips, information for emergency alerts and even commercial applications such as digital signage to devices.

via ATSC Adopts Non-Real-Time Standard – 2012-05-29 17:49:53 | Broadcasting & Cable.

240M smartphone users will stream TV by 2014: study – Research – Mobile Marketer

Consumers are watching TV on mobile.

Consumers are swapping out their television sets for mobile devices, according to a new study from Juniper Research.In Juniper’s “Mobile TV – What’s On” report, the research company looked at how consumers are using their devices to access TV content. In addition, the study looked at how revenue and subscriptions will contribute to the rise of mobile TV.

via 240M smartphone users will stream TV by 2014: study – Research – Mobile Marketer.

Mobile TV May Make A Comeback | TechPinions

I have been tracking the mobile TV space since the early 2000′s and mostly given up after the last push, using DVB-H failed. I tracked quite a bit of research around mobile TV in North America and we performed our own use case research as well. North America as a market for mobile TV is very different then markets like Asia and other parts of Europe.

Large parts of North American populations don’t spend long periods of time commuting on things like trains. In many other parts of the world this is the case and those markets are the ones where Mobile TV has had more success. However, with the rise of tablets, and perhaps even greater installed base of smartphones I wonder if Mobile TV could make a comeback.

While here at CTIA I got caught up with an organization called the OMVC or Open Mobile Video Coalition. This organization is helping launch a new service in the fall called Dyle.tv. What makes this solution different, and perhaps what gives it the best chance to succeed, is that it is built upon the existing ATSC digital broadcast infrastructure. DVB-H required quite a bit of new infrastructure investments and many did not make them. By integrating right into the existing ATSC infrastructure for broadcast today many broadcasters and networks immediately take advantage of this solution. There are two requirements to make this work. First the broadcast stations need only spend between 15,000-25,000 dollars to add the additional infrastructure to broadcast their existing ATSC signal to mobile devices. This, I am told, is very simple to install and would take a technician about two hours install. Second, the DTV chip needs to be embedded in a mobile device or built into an accessory for a mobile device like a tablet or smartphone.

via Mobile TV May Make A Comeback | TechPinions.

TVTechnology: ATSC: Harris Exec Warns of Mobile DTV Delays

TVTechnology: ATSC: Harris Exec Warns of Mobile DTV Delays

WASHINGTON: An executive with Harris Broadcast this week warned attendees at an industry meeting that broadcasters’ roll-out of Mobile DTV needs to move forward quickly or could risk becoming irrelevant.

“If we drag this out another two or three years, it will definitely be too late,” said Jay Adrick, vice president of broadcast technology at Harris Broadcast at the annual meeting of the Advanced Television Systems Committee in Washington this week. Adrick has been heavily involved in the development of the standard but said that remaining issues such as business models need to be formulated soon.

via TVTechnology: ATSC: Harris Exec Warns of Mobile DTV Delays.

As sales soar, Elemental raises $13M to help big media deliver video to multiple screens – GeekWire

Elemental Technologies CEO Sam Blackman wasn’t looking for cash. After all, more than half of the money from the company’s last round is still parked in the bank. But when you’ve got a business that’s nearly tripling revenues and operating in the super hot arena of mobile video processing, venture capitalists have the tendency to hover.

And hover they did around Elemental, a six-year-old Portland upstart that today is announcing a $13 million venture capital round from Norwest Venture Partners, General Catalyst, Voyager and others. That brings total funding in the 70-person company to just over $29 million.

via As sales soar, Elemental raises $13M to help big media deliver video to multiple screens – GeekWire.

Free live TV is coming to your smartphone and tablet | Dallas-Fort Worth Personal Technology News – Business News for Dallas, Texas – The Dallas Morning News

Would you like to watch live network TV on your smartphone or stream a movie? The answer is probably yes to both.Later this year, watching live television on mobile digital devices will become a reality for more than 90 stations in 35 markets, including Dallas.Thanks to Netflix, Hulu, iTunes, YouTube and a host of other websites, people already watch video on various-size screens.As looming broadband shortages worry wireless carriers, government officials, manufacturers and retailers, the stalwart 70-year-old broadcast television business believes it’s got it covered.

via Free live TV is coming to your smartphone and tablet | Dallas-Fort Worth Personal Technology News – Business News for Dallas, Texas – The Dallas Morning News.