V-Nova streaming tech produces 4K compression ‘worth watching’ – BBC News

V-Nova streaming tech produces 4K compression ‘worth watching’

1 April 2015 Last updated at 00:22 BST

A new method of data compression could see ultra-high definition video – also known as 4K – being streamed to TVs and other devices using around 50% of the bandwidth currently needed.

V-Nova has gathered 20 large telecoms, broadcast and IT companies including Sky, Intel, and the European Broadcasting Union to back its new Perseus technology.

It could see the average home broadband speed in the UK – around 22 megabits per second (Mbps) – support three 4K streams simultaneously instead of just one.

via V-Nova streaming tech produces 4K compression ‘worth watching’ – BBC News.

We need Immersive TV, not just 4K | VideoNet

There was a reminder at the recent SES Ultra HD Conference that some of the new technologies that are being investigated for UHD can also be applied to HDTV with potentially striking effect. Dr Giles Wilson, Head of TV Compression at Ericsson pointed out that if you take 10-bit, high dynamic range (HDR) and 60Hz (frame rate) and apply these to HD “it still provides a massive leap forward in the viewing experience…and there are circumstances where there is not enough bandwidth to offer UHD and you might want better HD.”

via We need Immersive TV, not just 4K | VideoNet.

Technicolor and Sinclair Broadcast Group Demonstrate Live Next Generation Television Platform for Broadcasters – MarketWatch

Sinclair Broadcast Group and Technicolor delivered an industry first by successfully deploying Technicolor’s ATSC 3.0 4K UltraHD testbed platform and receiving an over-the-air signal.

via Technicolor and Sinclair Broadcast Group Demonstrate Live Next Generation Television Platform for Broadcasters – MarketWatch.

Why Mobile Could Be The Primary Driver of 4K Experiences – Forbes

As I begin my journey to this year’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, I am thinking through the major trends and inflections that will most impact mobile technology and usage models going forward. One of those I wrote about last week was quick charging. What I would like to talk about now is 4K capabilities on mobile devices and how mobile could be the primary driver for 4K. Let me start with explaining what 4K is and how it applies to mobile devices. I also wanted to touch on some interesting things Qualcomm is doing in this arena.

via Why Mobile Could Be The Primary Driver of 4K Experiences – Forbes.

YouTube to show off low-bandwidth 4K streaming at CES | Stuff

With Netflix having announced plans for 4K streaming in 2014, it was only a matter of time before YouTube responded.

And, sure enough, YouTube is reportedly planning to demo its own improved, low-bandwidth 4K streaming technology at tech trade show CES next week, according to GigaOM. The service has supported 4K for some time already, but its new announcements will centre on tackling the main problem with the whole concept of 4K streaming – the bandwidth limitations of our creaky broadband and mobile networks.

YouTube won\’t be using the same H.265 video codec that\’s at the heart of Netflix\’s 4K streaming plan – instead, it\’ll use parent company Google\’s royalty-free VP9 codec to blast Ultra HD video down your internet pipes.

via YouTube to show off low-bandwidth 4K streaming at CES | Stuff.

Google’s VP9 Video Codec Gets Backing from ARM, Nvidia, Sony And Others

Google’s VP9 video codec is getting a major boost today. While Mozilla, Google’s own Chrome browser and a few video players like FFmpeg started supporting VP9 over the course of the last year, what was mostly missing from Google’s ecosystem for this highly efficient video codec was hardware support. As Google announced today, however, virtually all major hardware vendors will soon support VP9 natively in their products and allow Google’s YouTube to stream HD content up to 4K directly to computers, TVs and mobile devices.

via Google’s VP9 Video Codec Gets Backing from ARM, Nvidia, Sony And Others.